gauntlet


gauntlet
Ⅰ. gaunt·let1 also gant·let (gônt’lĭt, gänt’-)
n.
1. A protective glove, usually extending over some of the forearm, worn as part of medieval armor.
2. Any of various protective gloves, usually with an extended or flared cuff, as used in certain sports such as fencing and motorcycle riding, in cooking to handle hot objects, and other activities.
3. A challenge: »

throw down the gauntlet; take up the gauntlet.

4. A dress glove cuffed above the wrist.
[Middle English, from Old French gantelet, diminutive of gant, glove, from Frankish *want.]
gauntlet1
late 16th-century English
Ⅱ. gaunt·let2 also gant·let (gônt’lĭt, gänt’-)
n. 1) a) A form of punishment or torture in which people armed with sticks or other weapons arrange themselves in two lines facing each other and beat the person forced to run between them. b) The lines of people so arranged. 2) a) An arrangement of two lines of menacing or demanding people or things through which one must pass: »

moved through a gauntlet of shouting reporters.

b) A series of difficult or trying experiences: »

survived the gauntlet of adolescent humiliations.

[Alteration (influenced by GAUNTLET(Cf. ↑gauntlet)1) of gantlope, from Swedish gatlopp : gata, lane (from Old Norse; see ghē-) + lopp, course, running (from Middle Low German lōp).]
Word History: The two words spelled gauntlet may share associations with medieval violence, but they have separate origins. The word gauntlet used in the idiom to throw down the gauntlet comes from the Old French word gantelet, a diminutive of gant, "glove." (The idiom makes reference to the medieval custom of throwing down a glove in challenging an adversary to combat.) The gauntlet used in to run the gauntlet is an alteration of the earlier English form gantlope, which came from the Swedish word gatlopp, a compound of gata, "lane," and lopp, "course," a word related to lope and leap. The Swedish word for this traditional form of punishment, in which two lines of people beat a person forced to run between them, probably became known to English speakers as a result of the Thirty Years' War. Sweden played a leading role in the coalition of Protestant countries that fought against Spain and the Holy Roman Empire, and at the end of the war, in 1648, the Swedish empire emerged as a great power of Europe. It was during this period of expanding Swedish influence that gatlopp entered English. It seems, however, that from the moment English speakers borrowed the word, they inserted an n into the pronunciation of gatlopp—in the earliest known attestation of the word in English, dating from 1646, it is spelled gantelope. The English word was then influenced by the spelling of the other gauntlet, "a protective glove," eventually leading to the identical spellings used today.

Word Histories. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Gauntlet — or gantlet may mean:* Gauntlet (glove), protective gloves used as a form of armour * Gauntlet (marking), the white markings on one or more of the legs of an animal such as a cat or rabbit, making them look like they have a long white glove on *… …   Wikipedia

  • Gauntlet — Éditeur Atari Games Développeur Atari Games Concepteur Ed Logg …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Gauntlet IV — Éditeur Tengen Développeur Tengen Date de sortie 1993 Genre Action Mode de jeu 1 à 4 joueurs Plate forme …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Gauntlet — es una serie arcade de juegos de mazmorras desarrollado por Atari Games. Los juegos de la serie pueden referirse a: Gauntlet (1985) Gauntlet II (1986) Gauntlet: The Third Encounter (1990) Gauntlet III: The Final Quest (1991) Gauntlet IV (1993)… …   Wikipedia Español

  • gauntlet — Ⅰ. gauntlet [1] ► NOUN 1) a stout glove with a long loose wrist. 2) a glove worn as part of medieval armour, made of leather with protective steel plates. ● take up (or throw down) the gauntlet Cf. ↑throw down the gauntlet …   English terms dictionary

  • Gauntlet — Gaunt let, n. [F. gantelet, dim. of gant glove, LL. wantus, of Teutonic origin; cf. D. want, Sw. & Dan. vante, Icel. v[ o]ttr, for vantr.] 1. A glove of such material that it defends the hand from wounds. [1913 Webster] Note: The gauntlet of the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gauntlet — (engl.: Fehdehandschuh) bezeichnet unter anderem folgende Dinge: ein Computerspiel aus dem Jahr 1985, siehe Gauntlet (Computerspiel) das russische Luftabwehrraketensystem SA 15 Gauntlet, siehe Tor M1 einen Film von 1977, siehe Der Mann, der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • gauntlet — There are two distinct words here: (1) ‘a stout glove’ used in the expression throw down the gauntlet (= accept a challenge), from an Old French diminutive of gant meaning ‘glove’, and (2) used in the phrase run the gauntlet (= undergo a… …   Modern English usage

  • gauntlet — gauntlet1 [gônt′lit, gänt′lit] n. [ME < OFr gantelet, dim. of gant, a glove < Frank * want, a mitten, akin to EFris wante] 1. a medieval glove, usually of leather covered with metal plates, worn by knights in armor to protect the hand in… …   English World dictionary

  • Gauntlet — Gaunt let, n. (Mil.) See {Gantlet}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English